1. 17 minutes ago  /  76,804 notes  /  Source: supagirl

  2. A white girl wore a bindi at Coachella. And, then my social media feeds went berserk. Hashtagging the term “cultural appropriation” follows the outrage and seems to justify it at the same time. Except that it doesn’t.

    Cultural appropriation is the adoption of a specific part of one culture by another cultural group. As I (an Indian) sit here, eating my sushi dinner (Japanese) and drinking tea (Chinese), wearing denim jeans (American), and overhearing Brahm’s Lullaby (German) from the baby’s room, I can’t help but think what’s the big deal?

    The big deal with cultural appropriation is when the new adoption is void of the significance that it was supposed to have — it strips the religious, historical and cultural context of something and makes it mass-marketable. That’s pretty offensive. The truth is, I wouldn’t be on this side of the debate if we were talking about Native American headdresses, or tattoos of Polynesian tribal iconography, Chinese characters or Celtic bands.

    Why shouldn’t the bindi warrant the same kind of response as the other cultural symbols I’ve listed, you ask? Because most South Asians won’t be able to tell you the religious significance of a bindi. Of my informal survey of 50 Hindu women, not one could accurately explain it’s history, religious or spiritual significance. I had to Google it myself, and I’ve been wearing one since before I could walk.

    We can’t accuse non-Hindus of turning the bindi into a fashion accessory with little religious meaning because, well, we’ve already done that. We did it long before Vanessa Hudgens in Coachella 2014, long before Selena Gomez at the MTV Awards in 2013, and even before Gwen Stefani in the mid-90s.

    Indian statesman Rajan Zed justifies the opposing view as he explains, “[The bindi] is an auspicious religious and spiritual symbol… It is not meant to be thrown around loosely for seductive effects or as a fashion accessory…” If us Indians had preserved the sanctity and holiness of the bindi, Zed’s argument for cultural appropriation would have been airtight. But, the reality is, we haven’t.

    The 5,000 year old tradition of adorning my forehead with kumkum just doesn’t seem to align with the current bindi collection in my dresser — the 10-pack, crystal-encrusted, multi-colored stick-on bindis that have been designed to perfectly compliment my outfit. I didn’t happen to pick up these modern-day bindis at a hyper-hipster spot near my new home in California. No. This lot was brought from the motherland itself.

    And, that’s just it. Culture evolves. Indians appreciated the beauty of a bindi and brought it into the world of fashion several decades ago. The single red dot that once was, transformed into a multitude of colors and shapes embellished with all the glitz and glamor that is inherent in Bollywood. I don’t recall an uproar when Indian actress Madhuri Dixit’s bindi was no longer a traditional one. Hindus accepted the evolution of this cultural symbol then. And, as the bindi makes it’s way to the foreheads of non-South Asians, we should accept — even celebrate — the continued evolution of this cultural symbol. Not only has it managed to transcend religion and class in a sea of one-billion brown faces, it will now adorn the faces of many more races. And that’s nothing short of amazing.

    So, you won’t find this Hindu posting a flaming tweet accusing a white girl of #culturalappropriation. I will say that I’m glad you find this aspect of my culture beautiful. I do too.

    Why a Bindi Is NOT an Example of Culture Appropriation 

    by Anjali Joshi

    (via breannekiele)

    (via starborn-vagaboo)

    20 minutes ago  /  12,308 notes  /  Source: breannekiele

  3. photo

    photo

    23 minutes ago  /  425 notes  /  Source: daily-owls

  4. 30 minutes ago  /  6,270 notes  /  Source: kasukabe

  5. photo

    photo

    photo

    33 minutes ago  /  89,017 notes  /  Source: carlboygenius

  6. starborn-vagaboo:

WHEN MIDKIN ATTACK

    starborn-vagaboo:

    WHEN MIDKIN ATTACK

    34 minutes ago  /  468 notes  /  Source: babygoatsandfriends

  7. 35 minutes ago  /  15,466 notes  /  Source: tastefullyoffensive

  8. escapedgoat:

    xxvalleygirlxx:

    When a nigga call you baby in a deep raspy voice

    image

    When a baby call you nigga in a deep raspy voice

    image

    (via unsuccessfulmetalbenders)

    12 hours ago  /  144,759 notes  /  Source: xxvalleygirlxx

  9. afrofabulous asked: Do you think that 28 is too old to try to pursue a career in art on your own terms? I wanted to be a 3D animator for as long as I can remember, but when I got to college I realized that going to college for it wasn't for me. The school and the environment was horrible and I was completely uninspired to continue animation. I went to school for fashion illustration after that and I although my teachers thought my art was truly beautiful, I didn't get to finish because I started a family.

    bigbigtruck:

    (cont.) I became inspired again recently and I have been drawing and sketching everyday (for the past two years) as well as learning animation on my own. I am heavily influenced by your webcomic, but I just wanted to know if it was too late to pursue my dream without school and by myself at 28?

    I started TJ and Amal at 31, with a weak art education and zero experience in comics, so you can probably guess where I stand on the matter!

    I wish our culture didn’t place such heavy emphasis on “making it” in your teens and twenties; that the (justifiable!) attention paid to prodigies wouldn’t set “prodigy” as the norm.  This kind of BS does everyone a disservice.

    If you have a dream and the resources/ability to pursue it, there’s no reason to sit it out just because “everyone makes it by 25.” Because everyone DOESN’T make it by 25. Some do, some don’t, whatever.
    What’s more, age can bring experience that will inform your work — work you couldn’t have made at 20 or 25 without that experience.

    Sometimes when I get discouraged about this stuff, it helps to remember an anecdote I read a few years ago—
    A retiree mentions to her friend that she’s considering going back to college and finishing her degree.
    "What, at 65?" says her friend, "You’ll be at least 40 years older than everyone else in class!"
    To which the lady replies, “oh, so you think I should wait till I’m 70?”

    There’s no going backwards.

    Good luck!

    13 hours ago  /  1,051 notes  /  Source: bigbigtruck

  10. photo

    photo

    13 hours ago  /  114,672 notes  /  Source: billiondollarsuperhero